Ceramics at Viborg Museum

Ceramics at Viborg Museum

Today, marked the first experience I personally had with doing proper archaeological research. As a part of my Bachelor Degree, and as a main subject for my paper, I wanted to study the production of British as well as Danish ceramics. The idea behind this is that, while there is a general agreement that the two types are quite similar, there must still be something in the production which separates the two.

With this goal in mind, I decided to examine the British pottery that was available at the museums, with the standpoint being that, since I lack the appropriate knowledge and time to identify unknown possible sherds of British ceramics, I would rely on the skills of other archaeologists, while assuming that all sherds identified as British in origin were correctly identified. The ceramics examined today were from the excavation of the southern lake in Viborg. In total there were 18 sherds, with only 16 of them being available for closer study as the last two were on exhibit in the museum itself, museum and magazine are pictured above, the museum to the left and the magazine to the right.

The pottery examined at Viborg Museum

The pottery examined at Viborg Museum

18 sherds were examined in total, most of which originated from the aforementioned excavation, with some pieces having been identified as British ceramics after the excavation was publicized. The ware types varied from Torksey-type ware, Stamford ware, Grimston ware, as well as some ceramics which were identified as British but were not identified further as a specific ware type.

 

Amount of Pottery at Viborg Museum

 

The results of today have been that the British ceramics at Viborg have been wheelthrown and the inclusions, with the exception of one find in which the are granite inclusions, are made up of sand. While it is early to make any definite conclusions, it is a definite possibility that, while early Danish ceramics were usually formed by hand and pressing the clay into the desired shape, the early British ceramics were made on potters’ wheels, as seen with the Torksey-type ware. The dating of the pottery can most likely be placed somewhere between 1000-1400 AD based on the fact they were wheel thrown, the glaze used, as well as dating from the excavation. However, further conclusions must wait until I have examined the pottery at Ribe, where there is a much larger variation of British ceramics, and possibly covering a larger time span than that seen at Viborg.